Our Village

I was invited to Hastings to teach Tai Chi in the early 1970’s on Monday nights. Since it was after sunset, I never saw the town under daylight. Until one morning I was driven to town and caught sight of the sunrise on the Palisades as the car turned onto Main Street. I thought I was transported to a Frontier’s town in Southwest America with a cliff on fire across the Hudson! It was love at first sight!

In 1975, I bought a house and moved from West End Avenue and told people I moved further up to upper uptown.

Life was solitary and the village depressed. I spent endless moments sketching landscapes and Hopper-like shop fronts – a contrast to sixteen years of city life.

By 1981, after the U.S. had resumed diplomacy with China, I began visiting family in Bejing with my roll of paper and pencils. The 11 foot scroll in this exhibit was named “Ho Shr Din” meaning “When will you settle?” a rhetorical remark on my wandering life, as I had not lived in any spot for over three years since birth.

The last forty years, in fact, found me settled and grateful for having such a place to raise my family. Curiously, this sentiment is shared by members of the Studio Collective.

Together we decide to use this occasion to celebrate the riches from our community. Epitomized by a sunny Saturday morning at our remarkable Farmer’s Market.

Ed Young

2016

For Our Village the group members set out thinking about the following question. Which specific sites, local issues, and personal feelings about our place in the community will set in motion an artwork or project? By sharing our images with the people that share the experience of living here, we look to build community with our neighbors. This project follows Our River, which examined the village’s industrial pollution and the future of the waterfront.

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Ed Young, Farmer’s Market, 2016, 30″ x 22″, Cut Paper and Gouache Collage
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Diane Brawarsky, Snow Queen Of Hillside Woods, 2016, 12” x 12”, Oil on Panel
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Diane Brawarsky, Market Lady, 2016, 11-3/4” x 8-1/4”, Collage
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Pepe Coronado, Destino/memoria, 2016, Monoprint Collage, 14” x 14” Image
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Isabella Bannerman, Villard Morning, 2016, 11” x 17” painting, Gouache on Watercolor Paper
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Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #1, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2”, Archival Pigment Print
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Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #2, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, Archival Pigment Print
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Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #3, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2”, Archival Pigment Print
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Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #4, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2”, Archival Pigment Print
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Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #5, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2”, Archival Pigment Print
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Barbara King, Hastings Cutout, 2016, 60” x 42” x 2 1/2”, Paper
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Barbara King, Hastings Connections, 2016, 37” x 33”, Paper
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Barbara King, Barbara King Ravensdale Cutout, 2016, 23 1/2” x 38”, Paper
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Installation – Ed Young, When will you settle?, 1981, 18″ x 10′, Graphite Pencil
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Installation – Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #1,2,3,4,5,
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Installation – Ed Young, Full moon, 2016, 34″ x 93″, Pastel and Paper Collage
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Ed Young, Barbershop, 1980, 26″ x 28″, Conte Crayon
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Installation – Pepe Coronado, Destino/memoria
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Installation – Diane Brawarsky, Snow Queen Of Hillside Woods
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Installation – Ed Young, Sacred Rock, 2016, 21” x 30”, Charcoal, Barbershop, 1980, 26″ x 28″, Conte Crayon

Isabella Bannerman

Here is a slice of Hastings that begins at the corner of Broadway and Villard. One autumn morning, I was impressed by the colors, especially how the orange leaves were the same as the dome of St.Matthew’s. Knowing I would want to remember it, I quickly took a photo. Other colors: purples, yellows and blues seemed equally vibrant, and were set off by deep shadows in the foreground. All of this combined to give me a sort of secret happiness. Perhaps the narrow, tree lined and steep streets and paths of Hastings inspire this sense of discovery. Especially, of course, if you’re not rushing to catch a train!

 

Diane Brawarsky

When we decided to do a show called Our Village, I had to think about what makes living in Hastings so wonderful for me. I knew I loved living here but what about it did I love, how could I put that into an image. What came to mind was the peacefulness of the village and how much I love walking here. I thought of being in Hillside woods after a snowfall – it is incredibly tranquil and beautiful. The “Snow Queen of Hillside Woods” arose from that feeling.

A wonderful aspect of our collective is the sharing of our work with each other. Ed Young’s “Market” piece inspired my ”Market Lady”.

 

Pepe Coronado

My family and I lived in Hastings until 2015, when we moved to Harlem and I relocated my printmaking studio from 145 Palisade Street in Dobbs Ferry to East Harlem. Destino/memoria, is an abstract image showing a map of Hastings, the Palisades, and the Hudson River. We had a great experience in Hastings and now it is beginning to fall into the space of memory for me.

 

Barbara King

The starting point for this work is a map of the village of Hastings and a poem by a former neighbor, Jean Pattison. Jean became a friend and a mentor.  Her love of the community and her creativity inspired me. I chose a handwritten poem by Jean about connection and friendship and enlarged it on paper, traced it and cut the letters out. Next to this poem, is a cutout map that represents various streets in Hastings where I often walk. I have been walking in the village for years as a form of exercise and meditation. This piece led to another with a broader map of the village, which I enlarged and traced on paper. I cut the paper out around the streets for a decorative effect. This technique relates to the work I have been doing for the past several years, involving paper, decorative images and playing with positive and negative space.

 

Gina Randazzo

The Metro North trains represent the movement of time (both long and short term), the contemporary and old time quality of the village, and the location as a place near and away. The photographs explore the experience of motion, sound, wind and the changing sky.

As the 3:23 p.m. train departed from the Hastings station on a Tuesday afternoon, I photographed it up to the Railroad Avenue Bridge, a journey taking less than a minute. Five of those pictures are exhibited here.

 

Exhibition checklist

Isabella Bannerman, Villard Morning, 2016, 11” x 17” painting, 17” x 24” framed, Gouache on Watercolor Paper

Isabella Bannerman, Villard Morning, 2016, 11” x 17”, Archival Print

Diane Brawarsky, Snow Queen Of Hillside Woods, 2016, 12” x 12”, Oil on Panel

Diane Brawarsky, Market Lady, 2016, 11 3/4” x 8 1/4”, 15” x 11 1/2” framed, Collage

Diane Brawarsky, Study for Snow Queen #1, 2016, 6 1/2” x 3 1/2”, Oil on Paper

Diane Brawarsky, Study for Snow Queen #2, 2016, 7 1/2” x 3 1/4”, Oil on Paper

Diane Brawarsky, Study for Snow Queen #3, 2016, 8” x 4”, Oil on Paper

Pepe Coronado, Destino/memoria, 2016, Monoprint Collage, 14” x 14” Image, 20” x 20” framed

Barbara King, Hastings Cutout, 2016, 60” x 42” x 2 1/2”, Paper

Barbara King, Hastings Connections, 2016, 37” x 33”, Paper

Barbara King, Ravensdale Cutout, 2016, 23 1/2” x 38”, Paper

Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #1, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, 17” x 22 3/4” framed, Archival Pigment Print

Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #2, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, 17” x 22 3/4” framed, Archival Pigment Print

Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #3, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, 17” x 22 3/4” framed, Archival Pigment Print

Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #4, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, 17” x 22 3/4” framed, Archival Pigment Print

Gina Randazzo, Hudson Line, Departing Hastings #5, 2016, 12 1/2” x 17 1/2” print, 17” x 22 3/4” framed, Archival Pigment Print

Ed Young, Sacred Rock, 2016, 21” x 30”, framed, Charcoal

Ed Young, Farmer’s Market, 2016, 30″ x 22″, Cut Paper and Gouache Collage

Ed Young, Barbershop, 1980, 26″ x 28″, framed, Conte Crayon

Ed Young, Full moon, 2016, 34″ x 93″, Pastel and Paper Collage

Ed Young, When will you settle?, 1981, 18″ x 10′, framed, Graphite Pencil

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