Our River

Click here to view “Our River” exhibition catalogue and read exhibition essay by Juliana Krienik:

our-river-catalogue

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Diane Brawarsky, Hudson River: Summer, 2013, Collage on paper, 2014, 26” x 34”
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Diane Brawarsky, Hudson River: Fall, 2013, Collage on paper, 2014, 26” x 34”
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Diane Brawarsky, Hudson River: Spring, 2013, Collage on paper, 2014, 26” x 34”
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Diane Brawarsky, Hudson River: Winter, 2013, Collage on paper, 2014, 26” x 34”
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Isabella Bannerman, Hastings Riverfront Timeline, 2014, Folding accordion book, folding archival carrying case that includes title and credit panel, printed on Rives archival paper, 5″ x 84″
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Isabella Bannerman, Detail Hastings Riverfront Timeline
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Pepe Coronado, Presencia, 2014, Archival inkjet print, image size 15’ x 31”, paper size 24” x 37”
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Barbara King, The Hastings Water Tower & PCBs on the Hudson, 2014, Mixed media: printed photographs, encaustic, India ink on wood, 9” x 12”
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Barbara King, Waterfront Decisions in 3D, 2014, Mixed media: printed photographs, paper, black sharpie marker, colored pencil, 9” x 14” x 9”
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Barbara King, The Shell of Building 52 & Bacteria, 2014, Mixed media: photograph on vellum paper, photograph, Shadowbox: 17” x 21”
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Barbara King, The Hudson on Stage, 2014, Mixed media: photograph, construction paper, tissue paper, stick pins, tiles, Shadowbox: 13” x 13”
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Barbara King, Building 52 Reconfigured, 2014, Mixed media: photographs collaged, colored pencil, 13” x 15 1/4”
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Barbara King, Bacteria Released, 2014, Mixed media: photographs printed on white vellum paper, Shadowbox: 20” x 16”
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Barbara King, 52 on the Hudson, 2014, Mixed media: photograph printed on paper, graphite pencil, colored pencil, India ink, 13” x 15 1/4”
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Barbara King, Building 52 Transformed, 2014, Mixed media: photographs on vellum paper, 13” x 15 1/4”
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Barbara King, 52 on the Hudson, II, 2014, Mixed media: photograph printed on paper, graphite pencil, 8 3/4” x 14 1/4”
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Barbara King, Building 52 Refitted in a Shadowbox, 2014, Mixed media: photographs collaged, colored pencil, Shadowbox: 9” x 11”
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Gina Randazzo, Building 52, 2014, Archival pigment print, 30” x 24”

Building 52

1 River Street
Hastings-On- Hudson, NY

Building 52 is the only factory still standing at the former home of Anaconda Wire and Cable, which operated on this site from 1928 to 1975, employing many local citizens.

While producing cables for the Navy during World War II, Anaconda developed polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as a substitute for rubber insulation, which was then unavailable for import.

Later PCBs were found to be toxic, causing illness for plant workers and pollution of the Hudson River where they were dumped.

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Gina Randazzo, Building 52 Detail 1, 2014, Archival pigment print, 30” x 24”

Building 52 Detail 2

1 River Street
Hastings-On- Hudson, NY

The Anaconda property covers 28 acres of the Village’s Hudson River waterfront and is designated a Class 2 Superfund site, described by the Department of Environmental Conservation as “representing a significant threat to public health and/or the environment and requiring action.”

Pollutants include PCBs, asbestos, petroleum hydrocarbons and metals, such as lead, copper and zinc.

Decontamination and clean up are underway by British Petroleum, the current owner of the property, as are discussions of how the plot will be reused.

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Gina Randazzo, Building 52 Detail 2, 2014, Archival pigment print, 30” x 24”

Building 52 Detail 1

1 River Street
Hastings-On- Hudson, NY

Waterfront industry has been integral to the history of the Village of Hastings-on-Hudson since 1849, including the manufacturing and distribution of sugar, coal, bluestone, lumber, pavement, plaster, brass and cooper wire.

In recognition of this tradition some residents would like to see Building 52 restored as a historic landmark.

The saw-tooth roof structure, dating from the 19th century and popular until the widespread use of artificial lighting, utilized north facing daylight and is currently considered an environmentally efficient design tool.

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Ed Young, Sunrise on 52, 2014, Cardboard, paper, paint, 68″ x 18½”
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Ed Young, Human Ingenuity Reflected, 2014, Mixed media, 30″ x 18 1/2″
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Ed Young, Corrugated Waterfront, 2014, 3D Mixed media, 6” x 31″ x 10 3/4″
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Ed Young, Windmill, 2014, 3D Mixed media, 20” x 14″ x 5 1/2″
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Installation – Orr Room, Hastings Public Library
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